Dublin Summer Programme

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Established in summer 2011, the Dublin Summer Programme provides ND undergraduates with an intense summer immersion experience at O’Connell House. Twenty-six students live in Dublin for six weeks each summer, studying Irish history and culture with a rotating pair of ND professors. The inaugural session was led by Bob Schmuhl of American Studies and Kevin Whelan of the Keough Naughton Dublin Centre. Deb Rotman of Anthropology and the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement joined the faculty for the second summer.

Believing that students will learn just as much from their experiences as in the classroom, the programme takes advantage of the unique opportunities provided by its Dublin base. Students partake in a full cultural programme, including trips throughout Ireland, tours of museums, theatres and galleries, guest lectures, sporting events, and film screenings. Students also attend musical and theatrical performances in Dublin’s best-known venues.
While learning about James Joyce and the significance of Ulysses, students live out the first pages of the novel by swimming at Sandycove and following in the footsteps of Leopold Bloom on Bloomsday. Following their lectures on Northern Ireland, they venture into Belfast, beginning to understand the human element of the Troubles. Putting Irish history in a broader historical context, they journey to the early medieval monastic city at Glendalough and the 5,000 year old passage tombs at Newgrange and Knowth. In 2012, a week-long trip to the Burren was introduced, immersing students in the grey limestone hills, the archaeological landscape of the west of Ireland, and becoming part of village life in Ballyvaughan.

THE CITY OF DUBLIN

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Dublin, the capital of Ireland, is home to 1 million people within its greater metropolitan area. Half the population is under the age of 30, so it is one of Europe’s youngest capital cities.

Contemporary Dublin boasts a strong presence of ICT, financial services and other state-of-the-art industry. The city is home to a particularly strong cultural sector, including theatre, music, art, sport and film. Dublin has been famous for centuries as a literary capital. Among its writers are Jonathan Swift, Oscar Wilde, W. B. Yeats, James Joyce and Seamus Heaney.

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COURSE PROFILE DSP14

Dublin Summer Programme Brochure 2014

Kevin Whelan, Director of Notre Dame’s Dublin Centre.

Introduction to Ireland 1798 – present. Evolution of Irish culture from the eighteenth century to the contemporary period; It aims to give students a foundational understanding of the cultural inheritance of the island. While organised in broadly chronological terms, it will also examine crucial thematic concerns—landscape, history, languages, economy, society, politics and government, literature, music, sport.

P. J. Mathews, Professor of English, University College Dublin.

Reading the Irish Revival. This course will examine the Irish Revival (1891-1939) as a dynamic moment in modern Irish literature in which key literary figures like Yeats, Lady Gregory, Synge, and Joyce worked to make Ireland a centre of cultural innovation once again. The significance of the Revival to Ireland’s decolonisation and debates over an Irish national literature will provide a central focus.

DATE
2014: 25 May – 5 July

VENUE
The venue will be historic O’Connell House, long-time home of the celebrated Irish politician Daniel O’Connell.

HOUSING
Participants will be housed in state of the art student housing at University College Dublin.

COSTS
$5,500. This fee covers tuition, housing, health insurance, transportation from Dublin airport, local transportation (bus pass) and partial meal plan. Participants are responsible for their airfare to Dublin and all other expenses.

CREDITS
Two complementary classes, each counting for three ND credits, will be taught.

CULTURAL ENRICHMENT
Participants will be able to fully experience the vibrant life of the city of Dublin, as well as being encouraged to explore the historic Irish countryside. The two key classes will be supplemented by a diverse range of cultural enrichment opportunites: cultural, literary, musical, theatrical, sporting, political, culinary…

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